July’s Tree of the Month – Paperbark Maple (acer griseum)

The paperbark maple is an interesting species of tree. Specimens are often found in small gardents or at the edge of wooded areas.
gardening-graphics_1068619aPriory Press has picked this tree as it’s not your obvious candidate for selection, yet its a well-known breed. It’s wood is not used for paper stock and is uncommon in furniture making, yet its still our favourite ornamental tree. We only wish Dunstable, Beds was temperate enough to grow good specimens.
We think that the paperbark maple‘s cinnamon-brown, exfoliating bark is the star of this tree’s most attractive element. The paperbark maple is native to central China and was originally introduced to the United States by E. H. Wilson in 1901, through the Arnold Arboretum. Shortly after it was exhbitied around the UK in shows. Examples can be found in public and private arboretums and gardens up and down the British Isles.

Paperbark maples mature to 20-30 feet tall with a spread roughly half the height. Its growth habit ranges from upright oval to rounded to irregular. This slow growing tree puts on 6-12 inches of growth annually. The overall texture in all seasons is fine to medium-fine.

If the word ‘maple’ conjures a certain leaf shape to mind, it does not apply to the paperbark maple. Paperbark maple is the last of the trifoliate maples to colour in the autumn too.

AcerGriseum1 paperbarkmaples

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your favourite tree?

Photos by M. Majerus

 

 

 

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